Yale University School of Art
1156 Chapel Street, POB 208339
New Haven, Connecticut, 06520-8339
(203) 432-2600
GENERAL INFORMATION

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

REGISTRATION

No student may register for any term unless he or she is making satisfactory progress toward the degree and has been cleared by the Office of Student Financial Services to register. In compliance with Connecticut state law, no student will be allowed to register unless satisfactory evidence of immunity to measles and rubella has been presented to the Yale Health (see Required Immunizations under Health Services for School of Art Students).

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GRADING SYSTEM

All courses within the School of Art are graded Pass (P) or Fail (F). Letter grades are given for most courses taken outside the School, either in Yale College, the Graduate School, or any of the other professional schools at the University. Credit will be given for any passing grade (A-D). No credit will be given for a grade of F or an incomplete. Arrangements to finish incompletes are to be determined between the student and his or her instructor. Any incomplete that is not made up by registration in the next consecutive term will be recorded as an F on the transcript. Academic courses may also be elected under a Pass/Fail option whereby the registrar will interpret letter grades from them onto the transcript as Pass or Fail.

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COURSE CHANGES

It is the student’s responsibility to maintain an accurate course schedule in the Office of Academic Affairs. Any change (drop or add) to the schedule agreed upon at registration should be reported immediately. No adding of courses will be permitted after the first two weeks of any term. A student may, with the consent of the director of academic affairs, drop a course until midterm. At this time, courses are permanently entered onto the transcript. From midterm until the last day of classes in each term, a student may withdraw from a course with the permission of the instructor of the course and the director of academic affairs. At the time the student withdraws, the notation of W (Withdrew) will be entered onto the transcript. Course withdrawal forms may be obtained in the Office of Academic Affairs. Between the end of classes in each term and the beginning of the examination period, no student will be permitted to withdraw from any course. If the instructor of a course reports to the registrar that a student has not successfully completed a course from which the student has not formally withdrawn, a grade of F will be recorded in that course.

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PROGRESS REPORTS

Within one week following registration in any given term, students will be issued a copy of their course schedule that lists the courses for which they have registered. At the end of the academic year, each student will be issued a copy of his or her transcript indicating grades earned, which will serve as a progress report. Prior to issuance of this progress report, grades earned in the fall term will be available on request.

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REVIEW AND AWARDS

The M.F.A. degree is awarded by the University on the recommendation of the faculty of the School of Art. Each department in the School holds its own reviews of students’ work at regular intervals. At the end of each review, faculty may require a student to take a particular course or participate in a tutorial. This requirement supersedes the normal choice of electives. A student is considered to be in Good Academic Standing so long as he or she maintains a grade level of Pass in all courses and studio work. No student can progress to a subsequent term with a failing grade in his or her major field of study. Students are expected to attend and participate in all courses taken for credit in order to receive passing grades. If the work under review is not considered by the faculty to be satisfactory and deserving of credit toward the degree, the student will receive an academic warning. Students who have received such a warning during or at the end of any term will have to demonstrate a satisfactory level of quality and effort in their work by the next review period. If they fail to do this, they may not be invited back to complete the program. Disciplinary dismissal may take place at any time during the year for any student in the School. Exceptions to the regulations of the M.F.A. degree can be made only on the recommendation of the Academic Subcommittee, to which all applications on these matters must be addressed.

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COMMENCEMENT

Attendance is required at Commencement exercises for all M.F.A. candidates. Special permission to be excused must be obtained from the dean. In addition to the completion of degree requirements, satisfactory final review of the student’s work, and a thesis exhibition, submission of the following is required in order to graduate:

Graphic Design: Written Thesis

Painting/Printmaking: Slide or CD Portfolio

Photography: Print Portfolio

Sculpture: Slide or CD Portfolio

All degree requirements must be completed within three years of the student’s scheduled graduation date in order to obtain the M.F.A. degree. Those who are unable to meet this deadline and wish to pursue their degree further must reapply for this consideration and pay a re-registration fee, which is 10 percent of the current tuition rate.

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LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Students are expected to follow a continuous course of study at the School of Art. However, a student who wishes or needs to interrupt his or her study temporarily may request a leave of absence. There are three types of leave: personal, medical, and parental; all of which are described below. The general policies that apply to all types of leave are:

1. Any student who is contemplating a leave of absence should see the Director of Academic Affairs or his or her director of graduate studies to discuss the necessary application procedures.

2. All leaves of absence must be approved by the dean. Medical leaves also require the written recommendation of a Yale Health physician, as described below.

3. A student may be granted a leave of absence of one to two years. Any leave approved by the dean will be for a specified period.

4. International students who apply for a leave of absence must consult with OISS regarding their visa status.

5. A student on leave of absence may complete outstanding work in any course for which he or she has been granted extensions. He or she may not, however, fulfill any other degree requirements during the time on leave.

6. A student on leave of absence is not eligible for financial aid, including loans; and in most cases, student loans are not deferred during periods of nonenrollment.

7. A student on leave of absence is not eligible for the use of any University facilities normally available to enrolled students.

8. A student on leave of absence may continue to be enrolled in Yale Health by purchasing coverage through the Student Affliate Coverage plan. In order to secure continuous coverage from Yale Health, enrollment in this plan must be requested prior to the beginning of the term in which the student will be on leave or, if the leave commences during the term, within thirty days of the date when the leave is approved. Coverage is not automatic; enrollment forms are available from the Member Services department of Yale Health, 203.432.0246.

9. A student on leave of absence must notify the director of academic affairs in writing of his or her intention to return at least eight weeks prior to the end of the approved leave. In addition, if the returning student wishes to be considered for financial aid, he or she must submit appropriate financial aid applications to the School’s financial aid office to determine eligibility.

10. A student on leave who does not return at the end of the approved leave, and does not request and receive an extension from the dean, is automatically dismissed from the School.

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PERSONAL LEAVE OF ABSENCE

A student who wishes or needs to interrupt study temporarily because of personal exigencies may request a personal leave of absence. The general policies governing all leaves of absence are described above. A student who is current with his or her degree requirements is eligible for a personal leave after satisfactory completion of at least one term of study. Personal leaves cannot be granted retroactively and normally will not be approved after the tenth day of a term.

To request a personal leave of absence, the student must apply in writing before the beginning of the term for which the leave is requested, explaining the reasons for the proposed leave and stating both the proposed start and end dates of the leave and the address at which the student can be reached during the period of the leave. If the dean finds the student to be eligible, the leave will be approved. In any case, the student will be informed in writing of the action taken. A student who does not apply for a personal leave of absence, or whose application for a personal leave is denied, and who does not register for any term, will be considered to have withdrawn from the School.

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WITHDRAWAL

A student who wishes to withdraw from the M.F.A. program should confer with the director of academic affairs or the director of graduate studies in his or her department. The University identification card and all keys must be submitted with a formal letter of withdrawal. Students who do not register for any term, and for whom a leave of absence has not been approved, are considered to have withdrawn from the School. A student who discontinues his or her program of study during the academic year will have tuition charges prorated according to University policy as noted in the section on Tuition Rebate and Refund Policy. A student who has withdrawn from the School of Art in good standing and who wishes to resume study at a later date must apply for readmission. Neither readmission nor financial aid is guaranteed to students who withdraw.

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FINANCIAL AID AND GRADES

All students receiving any form of financial aid from the School of Art and the University (Federal Stafford loans, Federal Perkins loans, School of Art Work-Study jobs, scholarships) must maintain a satisfactory grade level in all courses and studio work. If in any course a student does not obtain a satisfactory grade level, the appropriate portion of loans and scholarships within the term will be canceled and no further aid will be allocated until there is proof of improvement and/or completion of course work.

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GENERAL REGULATIONS

1. Students are expected to conform to the regulations established by the School of Art. The School of Art Handbook, which contains more detailed rules and regulations, will be given to each student upon registration.

2. It is expected that students will attend all classes regularly and live within reasonable proximity to the School.

3. The School of Art reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any student whose educational development is unsatisfactory or whose conduct is deemed harmful to the School. Please refer to the policy on Student Grievances in the Bulletin & Calendar.

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MEDICAL LEAVE OF ABSENCE

A student who must interrupt study temporarily because of illness or injury may be granted a medical leave of absence with the approval of the dean, on the written recommendation of a physician on the staff of Yale Health. The general policies governing all leaves of absence are described above. A student who is making satisfactory progress toward his or her degree requirements is eligible for a medical leave any time after matriculation. The final decision concerning a request for a medical leave of absence will be communicated in writing by the dean.

The School of Art reserves the right to place a student on a medical leave of absence when, on the recommendation of the director of Yale Health or the chief of the Department of Mental Health and Counseling, the dean of the School determines that the student is a danger to self or others because of a serious medical problem.

A student who is placed on medical leave during any term will have his or her tuition adjusted according to the same schedule used for withdrawals (see Tuition Rebate and Refund Policy). Before re-registering, a student on medical leave must secure written permission to return from a Yale Health physician.

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MILITARY LEAVE READMISSIONS POLICY

Students who wish or need to interrupt their studies to perform military service are subject to a separate military leave readmissions policy. In the event a student withdraws or takes a leave of absence from Yale School of Art to serve in the military, the student will be entitled to guaranteed readmission under the following conditions:

1. The student must have served in the Armed Forces for a period of more than 30 consecutive days;

2. The student must give advance written or verbal notice of such service to the director of academic affairs. In providing the advance notice the student does not need to indicate whether he or she intends to return. This advance notice need not come directly from the student, but rather, can be made by an appropriate officer of the Armed Forces or official of the Department of Defense. Notice is not required if precluded by military necessity. In all cases, this notice requirement can be fulfilled at the time the student seeks readmission, by submitting an attestation that the student performed the service.

3. The student must not be away from the School to perform military service for a period exceeding five years (this includes all previous absences to perform military service but does not include any initial period of obligated service). If a student’s time away from the School to perform military service exceeds five years because the student is unable to obtain release orders through no fault of the student or the student was ordered to or retained on active duty, the student should contact the director of academic affairs to determine if the student remains eligible for guaranteed readmission.

4. The student must notify the School within three years of the end of his or her military service of his or her intention to return. However, a student who is hospitalized or recovering from an illness or injury incurred in or aggravated during the military service has up until two years after recovering from the illness or injury to notify the School of his or her intent to return.

5. The student cannot have received a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge or have been sentenced in a court-martial.

A student who meets all of these conditions will be readmitted for the next term, unless the student requests a later date of readmission. Any student who fails to meet one of these requirements may still be readmitted under the general readmission policy but is not guaranteed readmission.

Upon returning to the School, the student will resume his or her education without repeating completed course work for courses interrupted by military service. The student will have the same enrolled status last held and with the same academic standing. For the first academic year in which the student returns, the student will be charged the tuition and fees that would have been assessed for the academic year in which the student left the institution. Yale may charge up to the amount of tuition and fees other students are assessed, however, if veteran’s education benefits will cover the difference between the amounts currently charged other students and the amount charged for the academic year in which the student left.

In the case of a student who is not prepared to resume his or her studies with the same academic status at the same point where the student left off or who will not be able to complete the program of study, the School will undertake reasonable efforts to help the student become prepared. If after reasonable efforts, the School determines that the student remains unprepared or will be unable to complete the program, or after the School determines that there are no reasonable efforts it can take, the School may deny the student readmission.

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LEAVE OF ABSENCE FOR PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES

A student who wishes or needs to interrupt study temporarily for reasons of pregnancy, maternity care, or paternity care may be granted a leave of absence for parental responsibilities. The general policies governing all leaves of absence are described above. A student who is making satisfactory progress toward his or her degree requirements is eligible for parental leave any time after matriculation.

Any student planning to have or care for a child is encouraged to meet with his or her director of graduate studies and dean to discuss leaves and other short-term arrangements. For many students, short-term arrangements rather than a leave of absence are possible. Students living in University housing units are encouraged to review their housing contract and the related polices of the Graduate Housing Office before applying for a parental leave of absence. Students granted a parental leave may continue to reside in University housing to the end of the academic term for which the leave was first granted, but no longer.

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PLACEMENT

The School of Art maintains a placement service in the Office of Academic Affairs. Job notices are collected through faculty contacts and mailings and posted in a Job Book. Subscriptions are held to the College Art Association publications, Current Jobs in Art, Jobline, National Arts Jobbank, National Arts Placement, Sculptors International, and Society for Photographic Education Newsletter. Information on grants and fellowships is maintained, and an annual Career Workshop for second-year students takes place each fall. The above resources are available to our current students, alumni, and artists in the community. At the student’s request, the Office of Academic Affairs will maintain and send references and/or transcripts to prospective employers for a mailing fee. This service is free for all currently enrolled students.

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UNIVERSITY RESOURCES

Two sources of information about the broad range of events at the University are the Yale Bulletin & Calendar (YB&C), a newspaper printed weekly during the academic year, and the Yale Calendar of Events, an interactive calendar that can be found online at http://events.yale.edu/opa. The YB&C, which also features news about Yale people and programs, is available without charge at many locations throughout the campus and is sent via U.S. mail to subscribers; for more information, call 203.432.1316. The paper is also available online at www.yale.edu/opa/yb&c.

The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History contains collections in anthropology, mineralogy, oceanography, paleontology, and some aspects of geology.

There are more than eighty endowed lecture series held at Yale each year on subjects ranging from anatomy to theology, and including virtually all disciplines.

More than four hundred musical events take place at the University during the academic year. These include concerts presented by students and faculty of the School of Music, the Department of Music, the Yale Concert and Jazz bands, the Yale Glee Club, the Yale Symphony Orchestra, and other undergraduate singing and instrumental groups. In addition to graduate recitals and ensemble performances, the School of Music features the Philharmonia Orchestra of Yale, the Chamber Music Society at Yale, the Duke Ellington Series, the Horowitz Piano Series, New Music New Haven, Yale Opera performances and public master classes, and the Faculty Artist Series. The Institute of Sacred Music sponsors Great Organ Music at Yale, the Yale Camerata, the Yale Schola Cantorum, and numerous special events.

For theatergoers, Yale and New Haven offer a wide range of dramatic productions at the University Theatre, Yale Repertory Theatre, Yale Cabaret, Long Wharf Theatre, Palace Theater, and Shubert Performing Arts Center.

Founded in 1971, the Graduate-Professional Student Senate, Inc. (GPSS) is the official student government group representing all thirteen graduate and professional schools. All graduate and professional students are eligible to become senators via elections held each fall. The GPSS meets on alternating Thursdays throughout the academic year, and meetings are open to the graduate and professional school community. Senators serve on and make appointments to University committees, meet with University administrators, organize social events and orientation activities, provide modest funding to student groups, and assist in community service events. Additionally, the GPSS is housed at and oversees operation of the Graduate-Professional Student Center at Yale (GPSCY), at 204 York Street, which includes office and meeting spaces for student organizations, and the Gryphon’s Pub for those twenty-one and over. For more information, please contact gpss@yale.edu or visit www.yale.edu/gpss.

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The McDougal Graduate Student Center in the Hall of Graduate Studies provides space and resources for building intellectual, cultural, and social community among graduate students, and for enhancing professional development activities across the departments of the Graduate School. The McDougal Center houses the cooperating offices of Graduate Career Services, Graduate Student Life, the Graduate Teaching Center, and the Graduate Writing Program as well as the Resource Library, and works collaboratively with the Graduate School Office for Diversity. Graduate Career Services provides individual advising, programs, and a library of resource materials as well as Internet resources to assist Graduate School students and alumni/ae with career planning and decision making. In the Graduate Student Life Office, McDougal Fellows, who are current graduate students, plan and organize socials; public service activities; arts, music, and cultural events; sports and wellness activities; and events for international students and students with children. The Graduate Teaching Center provides in-class observation, individual consultation, and workshops. The Writing Center offers individual consultations with tutors, regular academic writing workshops, dissertation writing groups, and events with invited speakers. The McDougal Center welcomes the participation of postdoctoral fellows, alumni/ae of the Graduate School, students from other Yale professional schools, and members of the larger Yale community. The center has a large common room with comfortable furnishings for study or lounging, an e-mail kiosk, WiFi, newspapers and magazines, and the student-run Blue Dog Café, which serves coffee and light foods. Other resources include a large program room with AV equipment, small meeting rooms, a music practice room, a family playroom, and an ITS computer lab with laser printer and copier. The McDougal Center is open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. and weekends from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. during the academic year. For more information or to sign up for weekly e-mail Notes, visit the Web site at www.yale.edu/graduateschool/mcdougal; tel., 203.432.BLUE; e-mail, mcdougal.center@yale.edu.

The religious resources of Yale University serve all students, faculty, and staff. These resources are the University Chaplaincy (located on the lower level of Bingham Hall on Old Campus); the Yale University Church at Battell Chapel, an open and affirming church; and Yale Religious Ministry, the on-campus association of clergy and nonordained representatives of various religious faiths. The ministry includes the Chapel of St. Thomas More, the parish church for all Roman Catholic students at the University; the Joseph Slifka Center for Jewish Life at Yale, a religious and cultural center for students of the Jewish faith; Indigo Blue: A Center for Buddhist Life at Yale; several Protestant denominational ministries and nondenominational ministries; and student religious groups such as the Bahaffi Association, the Yale Hindu Council, and the Muslim Student Association. Additional information is available at www.yale. edu/chaplain. edu/chaplain.

The Payne Whitney Gymnasium is one of the most elaborate and extensive indoor athletic facilities in the world. This complex includes the 3,100-seat John J. Lee Amphitheater, the site for many indoor varsity sports contests; the Robert J. H. Kiphuth Exhibition Pool; the Brady Squash Center, a world-class facility with fifteen international-style courts; the Adrian C. Israel Fitness Center, a state-of-the-art exercise and weight-training complex; the Brooks-Dwyer Varsity Strength and Conditioning Center; the Colonel William K. Lanman, Jr. Center, a 30,ooo-square-foot space for recreational/intramural play and varsity team practice; the Greenberg Brothers Track, an eighth-mile indoor jogging track; and other rooms devoted to fencing, gymnastics, rowing, wrestling, martial arts, general exercise, and dance. Numerous physical education classes in dance (ballet, jazz, modern, and ballroom), martial arts, yoga and pilates, aerobic exercise, and sport skills are offered throughout the year. Yale undergraduates and graduate and professional school students may use the gym at no charge throughout the year. Academic term and summer memberships at reasonable fees are available for faculty, employees, postdoctoral and visiting fellows, alumni, and student spouses.

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During the year various recreational opportunities are available at the David S. Ingalls Rink, the McNay Family Sailing Center in Branford, the Yale Outdoor Education Center in East Lyme, the Yale Tennis Complex, the Yale Polo and Equestrian Center, and the Golf Course at Yale. Students, faculty, employees, students’ spouses, and guests of the University may participate at each of these venues for a modest fee. Up-to-date information on hours and specific costs at all these recreational facilities can be obtained from the Sport and Recreation Office (203.432.1431). Please check the Yale Athletics Web site (http://yalebulldogs.collegesports.com) for more information concerning any of these recreational facilities and programs.

Approximately fifty club sports come under the jurisdiction of the Office of Outdoor Education and Club Sports. Most of the teams are for undergraduates, but a few are available to graduate and professional school students. Yale undergraduates, graduate and professional school students, faculty, staff, and alumni/ae may use the Yale Outdoor Education Center (OEC), which consists of 1,500 acres surrounding a mile-long lake in East Lyme, Connecticut. The facility includes overnight cabins and campsites, a pavilion and dining hall available for group rental, and a waterfront area with supervised swimming, rowboats, canoes, and kayaks. Adjacent to the lake, a shaded picnic grove and gazebo are available to visitors. In another area of the property, hiking trails surround a wildlife marsh. The OEC runs seven days a week from the third weekend in June through Labor Day and then on September weekends. For more information, telephone 203.432.2492 or visit the Web page at http://yalebulldogs.collegesports.com (click on Recreational Choices, then on Outdoor Education Center).

Throughout the year, Yale University graduate and professional school students have the opportunity to participate in numerous intramural sports activities. These seasonal, team-oriented activities include volleyball, soccer, and softball in the fall; basketball and volleyball in the winter; softball, soccer, and volleyball in the spring; and softball in the summer. With few exceptions, all academic-year graduate-professional student sports activities are scheduled on weekends, and most sports activities are open to competitive, recreational, and coeducational teams. More information is available from the Intramurals Office in Payne Whitney Gymnasium, 203.432.2487, or online at http://yalebulldogs.collegesports.com.

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A GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

In a speech entitled The Global University, Yale President Richard C. Levin declared that as Yale enters its fourth century, its goal is to become a truly global university educating leaders and advancing the frontiers of knowledge not simply for the United States, but for the entire world.

The globalization of the University is in part an evolutionary development. Yale has drawn students from outside the United States for nearly two centuries, and international issues have been represented in its curriculum for the past hundred years and more. But creating the global university is also a revolutionary development signaling distinct changes in the substance of teaching and research, the demographic characteristics of students, the scope and breadth of external collaborations, and the engagement of the University with new audiences.

Yale University’s goals and strategies for internationalization are described in The Internationalization of Yale: The Emerging Framework, a document that embraces the activity of all parts of the University. The report is available online at www.world.yale.edu/pdf/Internationalization_of_Yale.pdf.

International activity is coordinated by several University-wide organizations in addition to the efforts within the individual schools and programs.

Launched in 2003 – 2004, the Office of International Affairs supports the international activities of all schools, departments, offices, centers, and organizations at Yale; promotes Yale and its faculty to international audiences; and works to increase the visibility of Yale’s international activities around the globe. Web site: www.yale.edu/oia.

The Office of International Students and Scholars is a resource on immigration matters and hosts orientation programs and social activities for the University’s international community. See below in this bulletin and www.oiss.yale.edu.

The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies is the University’s principal agency for encouraging and coordinating teaching and research on international affairs, societies, and cultures; www.yale.edu/macmillan.

Yale Center for the Study of Globalization draws on the rich intellectual resources of the Yale community, scholars from other universities, and experts from around the world to support teaching and research on the many facets of globalization, while helping to enrich debate through workshops, conferences, and public programs; www.ycsg.yale.edu.

The Yale World Fellows Program hosts eighteen emerging leaders from outside the United States each year for an intensive semester of individualized research, weekly seminars, leadership training, and regular interactions with the Yale community; www.yale.edu/worldfellows.

For additional information, the Yale and the World Web site is a compilation of resources for international students, scholars, and other Yale affiliates interested in the University’s global initiatives: http://world.yale.edu.

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HEALTH SERVICES FOR SCHOOL OF ART STUDENTS

The new Yale Health Center opens on campus at 55 Lock Street in late summer 2010 (until then, services will be provided at the 17 Hillhouse Avenue location). The center is home to Yale Health, a not-for-profit, physician-led health coverage option that offers a wide variety of health care services for students and other members of the Yale community. Services include student medicine, gynecology, mental health, pediatrics, pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, a seventeen-bed inpatient care facility (ICF), a round-the-clock acute care clinic, and specialty services such as allergy, dermatology, orthopedics, and a travel clinic. Yale Health coordinates and provides payment for the services provided at the Yale Health Center, as well as for emergency treatment, off-site specialty services, inpatient hospital care, and other ancillary services. Yale Health’s services are detailed in the Yale Health Student Handbook, available through the Yale Health Member Services Department, 203.432.046, or online at www.yale.edu/yhp.

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ELIGIBILITY FOR SERVICES

All full-time Yale degree-candidate students who are paying at least half tuition are enrolled automatically for YHP Basic Coverage. YHP Basic Coverage is offered at no charge and includes preventive health and medical services in the departments of Student Medicine, Internal Medicine, Gynecology, Health Education, and Mental Hygiene. In addition, treatment for urgent medical problems can be obtained twenty-four hours a day through Acute Care.

Students on leave of absence or on extended study and paying less than half tuition are not eligible for YHP Basic Coverage but may enroll in YH Student Affiliate Coverage. Students enrolled in the Division of Special Registration as nondegree special students or visiting scholars are not eligible for YHP Basic Coverage but may enroll in the YHP Billed Associates Plan and pay a monthly premium. Associates must register for a minimum of one term within the first thirty days of affiliation with the University.

Students not eligible for YHP Basic Coverage may also use the services on a fee-for-service basis. Students who wish to be seen fee-for-service must register with the YHP Member Services Department. Enrollment applications for the YHP Student Affiliate Coverage, Billed Associates Plan, or Fee-for-Service Program are available from the YHP Member Services Department.

All students who purchase YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage (see below) are welcome to use specialty and ancillary services at Yale Health Center. Upon referral, YH will cover the cost of specialty and ancillary services for these students. Students with an alternate insurance plan should seek specialty services from a provider who accepts their alternate insurance.

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HEALTH COVERAGE ENROLLMENT

The University also requires all students eligible for YH Basic Coverage to have adequate hospital insurance coverage. Students may choose YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage or elect to waive the plan if they have other hospitalization coverage, such as coverage through a spouse or parent. The waiver must be renewed annually, and it is the student’s responsibility to confirm receipt of the waiver form by the University’s deadlines noted below.

YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage

For a detailed explanation of this plan, see the YH Student Handbook, which is available online at www.yale.edu/yhp/pdf/studenthb.pdf.

Students are automatically enrolled and charged a fee each term on their Student Financial Services bill for YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage. Students with no break in coverage who are enrolled during both the fall and spring terms are billed each term and are covered from August 1 through July 31. For students entering Yale for the first time, readmitted students, and students returning from a leave of absence who have not been covered during their leave, YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage begins on the day the dormitories officially open. A student who is enrolled for the fall term only is covered for services through January 31; a student enrolled for the spring term only is covered for services through July 31.

Waiving the YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage: Students are permitted to waive YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage by completing a waiver form that demonstrates proof of alternate coverage. Waiver forms are available from the YH Member Services Department. It is the student’s responsibility to report any changes in alternate insurance coverage to the YH Member Services Department. Students are encouraged to review their present coverage and compare its benefits to those available under the YH. The waiver form must be filed annually and must be received by September 15 for the full year or fall term or by January 31 for the spring term only.

Revoking the Waiver: Students who waive YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage but later wish to be covered must complete and send a form voiding their waiver to the YH Member Services Department by September 15 for the full year or fall term, or by January 31 for the spring term only. Students who wish to revoke their waiver during the term may do so, provided they show proof of loss of the alternate insurance plan and enroll within thirty days of the loss of this coverage. YH premiums will not be prorated.

YH Student Two-Person and Family Plans

A student may enroll his or her lawfully married spouse or same-gender domestic partner and/or legally dependent child(ren) under the age of nineteen in one of two student dependent plans: the Two-Person Plan or the Student Family Plan. These plans include services described in both the YH Basic Coverage and the YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage. YH Prescription Plus Coverage may be added at an additional cost. Coverage is not automatic and enrollment is by application. Applications are available from the YH Member Services Department or can be downloaded from the YH Web site (www.yale.edu/yhp) and must be renewed annually. Applications must be received by September 15 for full-year or fall-term coverage, or by January 31 for spring-term coverage only.

YH Student Affiliate Coverage

Students on leave of absence or extended study, students paying less than half tuition, or students enrolled in the Eli Whitney Program prior to September 2007 may enroll in YH Student Affiliate Coverage, which includes services described in both the YH Basic and the YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage. Prescription Plus Coverage may also be added for an additional cost. Applications are available from the YH Member Services Department or can be downloaded from the YH Web site (www.yale.edu/yhp) and must be received by September 15 for full-year or fall-term coverage, or by January 31 for spring-term coverage only.

YH Prescription Plus Coverage

This plan has been designed for Yale students who purchase YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage and student dependents who are enrolled in either the Two-Person Plan, the Student Family Plan, or Student Affiliate Coverage. YH Prescription Plus Coverage provides protection for some types of medical expenses not covered under YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage. Students are billed for this plan and may waive this coverage. The online waiver (www.yhpstudentwaiver.yale.edu) must be filed annually and must be received by September 15 for the full year or fall term or by January 31 for the spring term only. For a detailed explanation, please refer to the YH Student Handbook.

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ELIGIBILITY CHANGES

Withdrawal: A student who withdraws from the University during the first ten days of the term will be refunded the premium paid for YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage and/or YH Prescription Plus Coverage. The student will not be eligible for any YH benefits, and the student’s YH membership will be terminated retroactive to the beginning of the term. The medical record will be reviewed, and any services rendered and/or claims paid will be billed to the student on a fee-for-service basis. At all other times, a student who withdraws from the University will be covered by YH for thirty days following the date of withdrawal or to the last day of the term, whichever comes first. Premiums will not be prorated or refunded. Students who withdraw are not eligible to enroll in YH Student Affiliate Coverage.

Leaves of Absence: Students who are granted leaves of absence are eligible to purchase YH Student Affiliate Coverage during the term(s) of the leave. If the leave occurs during the term, YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage will end on the date the leave is granted and students may enroll in YH Student Affiliate Coverage. Students must enroll in Affiliate Coverage prior to the beginning of the term during which the leave is taken or within thirty days of the start of the leave. Premiums paid for YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage will be applied toward the cost of Affiliate Coverage. Coverage is not automatic and enrollment forms are available at the YH Member Services Department or can be downloaded from the YH Web site (www.yale.edu/yhp). Premiums will not be prorated or refunded.

Extended Study or Reduced Tuition: Students who are granted extended study status or pay less than half tuition are not eligible for YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage and YH Prescription Plus Coverage. They may purchase YH Student Affiliate Coverage during the term(s) of extended study. This plan includes services described in both the YH Basic and the YH Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage. Coverage is not automatic and enrollment forms are available at the YH Member Services Department or can be downloaded from the YH Web site (www.yale.edu/yhp). Students must complete an enrollment application for the plan prior to September 15 for the full year or fall trm, or by January 31 for the spring term only.

For a full description of the services and benefits provided by YHP, please refer to the YH Student Handbook, available from the YH Member Services Department, 203.432.0246, 55 Lock Street, PO Box 208237, New Haven CT 06520-8237.

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REQUIRED IMMUNIZATIONS

Measles (Rubeola) and German Measles: All students who were born after December 31, 1956, are required to provide proof of immunization against measles (rubeola) and German measles (rubella). Connecticut state law requires two doses of measles vaccine. The first dose must have been given after January 1, 1969, and after the student’s first birthday. The second dose must have been given after January 1, 1980. These doses must be at least 30 days apart. Connecticut state law requires proof of one dose of rubella vaccine administered after January 1, 1969, and after the student’s first birthday. The law applies to all students unless they present (a) a certificate from a physician stating that such immunization is contraindicated, (b) a statement that such immunization would be contrary to the student’s religious beliefs, or © documentation of a positive blood titer for measles and rubella.

Meningococcus (Meningitis): All students living in on-campus housing must be vaccinated against Meningococcal disease. The law went into effect in September 2002, meaning that all returning students who plan to live in University housing must be immunized or show proof of immunization within the last five years. Students who are not compliant with this law will not be permitted to register for classes or move into the dormitories for the fall term, 2005. Please note that the State of Connecticut does not require this vaccine for students who intend to reside off campus.

Note: Students who have not met these requirements prior to arrival at Yale University must receive the immunizations from YHP and will be charged accordingly.

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RESOURCE OFFICE ON DISABILITIES

The Resource Office on Disabilities facilitates accommodations for undergraduate and graduate and professional school students with disabilities who register with and have appropriate documentation on file in the Resource Office. Early planning is critical. Documentation may be submitted to the Resource Office even though a specific accommodation request is not anticipated at the time of registration. It is recommended that matriculating students in need of disability-related accommodations at Yale University contact the Resource Office by June 4. Special requests for University housing need to be made in the housing application. Returning students must contact the Resource Office at the beginning of each term to arrange for course and exam accommodations.

The Resource Office also provides assistance to students with temporary disabilities. General informational inquiries are welcome from students and members of the Yale community and from the public. The mailing address is Resource Office on Disabilities, Yale University, PO Box 208305, New Haven CT 06520-8305. The Resource Office is located at 35 Broadway (rear entrance), Room 222. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Voice callers may reach staff at 203.432.2324; fax at 203.432.8250. The Resource Office may also be reached by e-mail (judith.york@yale. edu) or through its Web site (www.yale.edu/rod).

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TITLE IX POLICY & RESOURCES

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance.

The University is committed to providing an environment free from discrimination on the basis of sex. Yale provides many resources to students, faculty and staff to address concerns relating to discrimination on the basis of sex, which includes sexual misconduct.

Stephanie Spangler, Deputy Provost for Health Affairs & Academic Integrity, oversees and provides leadership for the activities of the Title IX coordinators, the administrators who carry out investigations, compliance-related responsibilities and reporting. She also leads the University’s efforts in relation to campus climate and gender, and oversees education and training campus-wide on sex discrimination and sexual misconduct.

Any student, faculty or staff member, or applicant for admission or education who has concerns about sex discrimination or sexual misconduct is encouraged to seek the assistance of a Title IX coordinator. The School of Art’s Title IX Coordinator is Lisa Kereszi, DUS, whose office is in Room 122 of Green Hall. 432-2600. Michelle Lopez is the acting coordinator during Lisa’s leave, Spring 2014.

Contact a coordinator if you:

Wish to understand your options if you think you may have encountered sex discrimination or sexual misconduct; Learn of a situation that you feel may warrant a University investigation; Need help on how to handle a situation by which you are indirectly affected; Seek guidance on possible informal remedies or administrative measures to de-escalate or alleviate a difficult situation; Have questions about Yale’s policies and procedures. Coordinators can also facilitate a formal or informal complaint through the University-wide Committee on Sexual Misconduct (UWC) or a police report with the YPD.

Conversations with coordinators are kept as confidential as possible, but information about incidents of sexual misconduct must be shared with relevant administrators if the University needs to take action for reasons of community safety. In all cases, the wishes of the person initiating the conversation are given full consideration.

Resources: http://provost.yale.edu/title-ix/other-resources

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OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND SCHOLARS

The Office of International Students and Scholars (OISS) coordinates services and support for Yale’s international students, faculty, staff, and their dependents. OISS assists members of the Yale international community with all matters of special concern to them and serves as a source of referral to other university offices and departments. OISS staff provide assistance with employment, immigration, personal and cultural adjustment, and family and financial matters, as well as serve as a source of general information about living at Yale and in New Haven. In addition, as Yale University’s representative for immigration concerns, OISS provides information and assistance to students, staff, and faculty on how to obtain and maintain legal status in the United States, issues the visa General Information 73 documents needed to request entry into the U.S. under Yale’s immigration sponsorship, and processes requests for extensions of authorized periods of stay, school transfers, and employment authorization. All international students and scholars must register with OISS as soon as they arrive at Yale, at which time OISS will provide information about orientation activities for newly arrived students, scholars, and family members. OISS programs, like the international coffee hours, Community Friends hosting program, daily English conversation groups and conversation partners program, U.S. culture workshops, and receptions for newly arrived graduate students, postdoctoral associates, and visiting scholars, provide an opportunity to meet members of Yale’s international community and become acquainted with the many resources of Yale University and New Haven. OISS welcomes volunteers from the Yale community to serve as local hosts for international students and as English conversation partners. Interested individuals should contact OISS at 203.432.2305.

OISS maintains an extensive Web site (www.yale.edu/oiss) with useful information for students and scholars prior to and upon arrival in New Haven. As U.S. immigration regulations are complex and change rather frequently, we urge international students and scholars to visit the office and check the Web site for the most recent updates.

International students, scholars, and their families and partners can connect with OISS and the international community at Yale by subscribing to the following e-mail lists. OISS-L is the OISS electronic newsletter for Yale’s international community. YaleInternational E-Group is an interactive list through which over 3,000 international students and scholars connect to find roommates, rent apartments, sell cars and household goods, find companions, and keep each other informed about events in the area. Spouses and partners of international students and scholars will want to get involved with the organization called International Spouses and Partners at Yale (ISPY), which organizes a variety of programs for the spouse and partner community. To subscribe to any list, send a message to oiss@yale.edu.

Housed in the International Center for Yale Students and Scholars at 421 Temple Street, the Office of International Students and Scholars is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., except Tuesday, when the office is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; tel. 203.432.2305.

Other guidelines for international students are found under Entrance Requirements and Financial Aid.

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INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR YALE STUDENTS AND SCHOLARS

INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR YALE STUDENTS AND SCHOLARS

The International Center for Yale Students and Scholars, located at 421 Temple Street, across the street from Helen Hadley Hall, offers a central location for programs that both support the international community and promote cross-cultural understanding on campus. The center, home to the Office of International Students and Scholars (OISS), provides a welcoming venue for students and scholars who want to peruse resource materials, check their e-mail, and meet up with a friend or colleague. Open until 9 p.m. on weekdays during the academic year, the center also provides office and meeting space for student groups, and a space for events organized by both student groups and University departments. In addition, the center has nine library carrels that can be reserved by academic departments for short-term international visitors. For more information, call 203.432.2305 or visit the center at 421 Temple Street.

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POLICY STATEMENTS

The University is committed to basing judgments concerning the admission, education, and employment of individuals upon their qualifications and abilities and affirmatively seeks to attract to its faculty, staff, and student body qualified persons of diverse backgrounds. In accordance with this policy and as delineated by federal and Connecticut law, Yale does not discriminate in admissions, educational programs, or employment against any individual on account of that individual’s sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a special disabled veteran, veteran of the Vietnam era, or other covered veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression.

University policy is committed to affirmative action under law in employment of women, minority group members, individuals with disabilities, special disabled veterans, veterans of the Vietnam era, and other covered veterans.

Inquiries concerning these policies may be referred to the Office for Equal Opportunity Programs, 221 Whitney Avenue, 203.432.0849. In accordance with both federal and state law, the University maintains information concerning current security policies and procedures and prepares an annual crime report concerning crimes committed within the geographical limits of the University. In addition, in accordance with federal law, the University maintains information concerning current fire safety practices and prepares an annual fire safety report concerning fires occurring in on-campus student housing facilities. Upon request to the Office of the Vice President for Human Resources and Administration, PO Box 208322, New Haven CT 06520-8322, 203.432.8049, the University will provide such information to any applicant for admission.

In accordance with federal law, the University prepares an annual report on participation rates, financial support, and other information regarding men’s and women’s intercollegiate athletic programs. Upon request to the Director of Athletics, PO Box 208216, New Haven CT 06520-8216, 203.432.1414, the University will provide its annual report to any student or prospective student.

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FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA)

Notification of Your Rights under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:

(1) The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access.

A student should submit to the registrar of his or her school or program a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.

(2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA.

A student who wishes to ask the University to amend a record should write the registrar of his or her school or program, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants to have changed, and specify why it should be changed. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested, the University will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing re¬garding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

(3) The right to provide written consent before the University discloses personally identifiable information from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without con¬sent.

Title 34 Section 99.31 of the Code of Federal Regulations describes the circumstances in which the University may disclose personally identifiable information without a student’s consent. The following are additional important details on Yale’s policy regarding three of those circumstances:

(a) The University discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including law en¬forcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted as its agent to provide a service instead of using University employees or officials; fellows of the Yale Corporation and non-trustee members of Yale Corporation committees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance com¬mittee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an educa¬tion record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the University.

(b) As a public service, the University may disclose without consent directory information of the following kinds:

~ the name of a student who is or has been in attendance;

~ dates of attendance;

~ school or residential college affiliation;

~ local and other addresses and local telephone number;

~ electronic mail address;

~ date and place of birth;

~ major field of study;

~ enrollment status;

~ participation in University-sponsored extracurricular activities and sports;

~ the height and weight of members of athletic teams;

~ degrees, honors, and awards received;

~ previous educational institution(s) attended;

~ name and address of parent or guardian;

~ picture and video;

~ University person identifier (UPI).

Additional details regarding directory information are available at [link to Directory Information Statement].

© Upon request, the University will disclose education records without consent to offi¬cials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA.

The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is

Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901

The rights listed above go into effect on the first day of classes for the school or program in which the student has enrolled.

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