Yale University School of Art
1156 Chapel Street, POB 208339
New Haven, Connecticut, 06520-8339
(203) 432-2600

INDIVIDUAL MEETINGS TUESDAY MORNING APRIL 11

  • 10:00 Matt
  • 11:00 Dustin
  • 12:00 Nilas
  • 1:00 Ingrid
Last edited by: Dan Michaelson
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INDIVIDUAL MEETINGS MONDAY APRIL 3

  • 2:15
  • 3:00 +Bryce
  • 3:45 ~Hicham
  • 4:30——————————muxi
  • 5:15
  • 6:00
  • 6:45
  • 7:30 Christine
Last edited by: Muxi Gao
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INDIVIDUAL MEETINGS TUESDAY APRIL 4

  • 2:15 ziwei (in lab room 215)
  • 3:00 Youngeun Hrefna
  • 3:45 Nate
  • 4:30 Guillaume
  • 5:15 Matt
  • 6:00 Dustin
  • 6:45 Nilas
  • 7:30 ingu
Last edited by: Ziwei Zhang
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ART742B NETWORKS & TRANSACTIONS SPRING 2017

TA: Chris Rypkema

Last edited by: Dan Michaelson
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REQUIRED ACCOUNTS

Create a free account on Github

Provide your email address and Github account to Chris. You’ll be added to our Cloud9 team with a free education account.

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PROJECT 1: PROTOCOL

Design your own protocol, a system of communication or exchange, in the real world. Your implementation and documentation should be beautiful – and specific enough that you can conduct communication or exchange with another person who has only read the document, in class next week. If your protocol is meant for use outside a classroom, you must still bring the protocol’s documentation, and additionally bring images of your system in use in its intended environment. This will be a two-week project.

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SET 1: PROTOCOL

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Alexander Galloway, from Protocol

SET 2: SPEED

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Josef Albers, “On the economy of typeface”
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1926-josef-albers-universal-typeface_648
1926

SET 3: THE WORLD AS A PRINTING SURFACE

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Walter Benjamin, “Unpacking My Library”

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Paul Elliman, “The world as a printing surface”
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SET 4: FREEDOM

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Yochai Benkler, from The Wealth of Networks


PROJECT 2: CHANGE

Using Meteor, create a website that changes over time. From hour to hour, day to day, week to week, semester to semester, or year to year.

The website may, or may not, store in a database content provided by you or others. It also may, or may not, support realtime communication between users.

Last edited by: Dan Michaelson
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Creating and running a Meteor app in Cloud9
In Cloud9, create a Blank workspace

# First time only, install Meteor:
curl https://install.meteor.com/ | sh

# To do list tutorial:
https://www.meteor.com/tutorials/blaze/creating-an-app

# Create the app:
meteor create simple-todos

# Change directories into the app:
cd simple-todos

# On Cloud9, instead of meteor npm install to configure the app:
meteor npm install --save babel-runtime

# On Cloud9, instead of meteor to launch the server:
meteor --port $IP:$PORT

# Ctrl-C to stop the server

# To start the server again:
meteor --port $IP:$PORT

To-do list code from class, in GitHub:
https://github.com/yaleinteractive/simple-todos

You can also clone a new Cloud9 workspace from git@github.com:yaleinteractive/simple-todos.git

Last edited by: Nathan Jeffrey Barros Pyper
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Deploying a Meteor app to a Heroku production server
DEPLOYING TO A PRODUCTION HOST (HEROKU)

Follow the instructions in this tutorial starting from the section labelled 
“CREATE HEROKU INSTANCE”:
https://www.coshx.com/blog/2016/08/19/how-to-deploy-a-meteor-1-4-app-to-heroku/
Last edited by: Bryce Sutton Wilner
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GRAPHIC DESIGN, 742, Networks & Transactions

For first-year graphic design students. How can graphic design influence and be influenced by the unpredictable encounters between one group and another? Or between quantities of unknown users on one side, and vast webs of fluctuating information on the other? In this course students develop typographies, visual languages, and motion vocabularies appropriate for these pervasive conditions of the modern world, found in experiences as varied as Facebook, YouTube “supercuts,” the game of chess, automated stock trading, and the organization and speech patterns of political movements. The course posits that designed form may sometimes be visible, and at other times be relational or latent rather than directly seen. The class is primarily a studio course but also includes a programming lab in which fundamentals of coding are taught through hands-on work each week. No previous programming experience is assumed, and completed projects are expected to be technological in nature. Weekly reading discussions from a range of sources complete a triangle of design, practice, and theory.

Last edited by: Teto Elsiddique
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